Category Archives: Eskrima

Self Defence, Blade Awareness & Security Tactics

This is the last call for anybody interested in the escrima concepts seminar this weekend at Dublin’s Martial Arts Academy, Magennis Place, Pearse St.
Right opposite the DART station.

We are starting at 11am sharp on Sat morning and will be covering weapon and knife defence, blade awareness and self defence/self protection tactics for both civilian and the security industry.

The seminar runs Sat 1100 – 1700 and Sunday 1100 – 1500.
€50/day, or €80 for both days.

We will also be asking all the Irish FMA instructors to sit down over a pint and discuss the formation of the Irish Council of Eskrima, Kali, Arnis Instructors.

See you there.

Wild Geese
www.wg-fit.com
www.wildgeesema.com
any cause but our own

Self Defence, Blade Awareness & Security Tactics

This is the last call for anybody interested in the escrima concepts seminar this weekend at Dublin’s Martial Arts Academy, Magennis Place, Pearse St.
Right opposite the DART station.

We are starting at 11am sharp on Sat morning and will be covering weapon and knife defence, blade awareness and self defence/self protection tactics for both civilian and the security industry.

The seminar runs Sat 1100 – 1700 and Sunday 1100 – 1500.
€50/day, or €80 for both days.

We will also be asking all the Irish FMA instructors to sit down over a pint and discuss the formation of the Irish Council of Eskrima, Kali, Arnis Instructors.

See you there.

Wild Geese
www.wg-fit.com
www.wildgeesema.com
any cause but our own

Irish Council of Eskrima Kali Arnis Instructors

Right, it’s about time we got the ball rolling properly.

In 2006 3 people got together and formed a non political umbrella organisation in the UK in order to promote the Filipino martial arts and ensure it’s quality is maintained at a high level. It was fortunate that one of those 3 was Pat O’Malley, in the last 2 years he has cajoled, bribed and bullied representatives of around 20 styles of FMA to join the council.

There are now similar councils in the Philippines (to whom we all answer, yes even Pat!), Italy and New Zealand. I believe Australia and Germany are in the process of forming.

Here in Ireland we are a minority, but we have several notable groups, including in no particular order, and by no means exclusive:
Sayoc Kali
Atienza Kali
Doce Pares Eskrima
Warriors Eskrima
Kalis Illustrissimo
Lescima

I’m sure here are a few more round, lurking under the radar.
There is plenty of room for us all to work together to bring FMA into the light, ensure only qualified instructors are teaching and gain proper recognition.
Having FMA featured in various movies (Bourne, The Hunted etc) and documentaries (Mind, Body &…., Human Weapon and Fight Quest) is great for us, but we could be doing more to promote ourselves.

Drop me a line, or email if your interested in bettering your art. Sure, why wouldn’t you?

The rules and regs of the British council are here http://www.bckeai.co.uk/ the other councils have basically emulated this, and we all report to the Philippine council.

Any questions can be directed to either me or the British council.

Wild Geese
any cause but our own

PS, Don’t forget the upcoming Escrima Concepts weekend

Irish Council of Eskrima Kali Arnis Instructors

Right, it’s about time we got the ball rolling properly.

In 2006 3 people got together and formed a non political umbrella organisation in the UK in order to promote the Filipino martial arts and ensure it’s quality is maintained at a high level. It was fortunate that one of those 3 was Pat O’Malley, in the last 2 years he has cajoled, bribed and bullied representatives of around 20 styles of FMA to join the council.

There are now similar councils in the Philippines (to whom we all answer, yes even Pat!), Italy and New Zealand. I believe Australia and Germany are in the process of forming.

Here in Ireland we are a minority, but we have several notable groups, including in no particular order, and by no means exclusive:
Sayoc Kali
Atienza Kali
Doce Pares Eskrima
Warriors Eskrima
Kalis Illustrissimo
Lescima

I’m sure here are a few more round, lurking under the radar.
There is plenty of room for us all to work together to bring FMA into the light, ensure only qualified instructors are teaching and gain proper recognition.
Having FMA featured in various movies (Bourne, The Hunted etc) and documentaries (Mind, Body &…., Human Weapon and Fight Quest) is great for us, but we could be doing more to promote ourselves.

Drop me a line, or email if your interested in bettering your art. Sure, why wouldn’t you?

The rules and regs of the British council are here http://www.bckeai.co.uk/ the other councils have basically emulated this, and we all report to the Philippine council.

Any questions can be directed to either me or the British council.

Wild Geese
any cause but our own

PS, Don’t forget the upcoming Escrima Concepts weekend

The Wrong End Of the Stick

I often find that peoples view of the Filipino Martial Arts is somewhat inaccurate. I hope here to put it right.

FMA otherwise known as Eskrima, Kali or Arnis are the fighting arts native to the Philippines, and are a complete combat method. Unfortunately the popular view of these arts is that it’s just “Stick Fighting”.

This was illustrated most clearly by the owner of the Martial Arts Academy when he offered to make up posters to advertise our class. Guess what we got.

Yep, you guessed it. “Learn Stick Fighting”

Now while we do train with sticks, no argument there, we also fight with sticks. This is the start point for any new FMAer, learn to swing a stick. But that’s just the beginning.

As I said it’s a complete fighting system used throughout the ages to fight off rival tribes and invasions (including Magellan and the Spanish and later the Japanese in world war 2), would stick fighting cover this.

No. Most people fail to see the unarmed combat, the knife/machete use and defence. The Filipino method is to teach you to instinctively use any weapon that comes to hand to fight against any weapon that comes at you. Be it a punch, kick, blade or blunt instrument. It is this versatility that attracted notable martial artists like Ed Parker, Bruce Lee and Dan Innosanto to add elements taken from Kali/Arnis and add it into their respective styles.

Within FMA there are many areas to cover and masters do specialise, Momoy Canete specialised in longer range Espada y Daga, Cacoy Canete specialised in close range stick fighting. Antonio Illustrisimo specialised in the blade, Joe Borces uses “eskrido” a combination of traditional FMA and Aikido/Judo methods.
But these are the masters. Any student must be able to defend themselves against unarmed and armed attacks while they themselves may or may not be armed.

I have my students fighting 1 on 1, 2 on 1, 2 on 2, every man for themselves and many other combo’s.
I have an unarmed guy fighting against a knife man, or a single stick fighting against double stick. We allow disarms but expect the fight to continue so a fight er becomes used to loosing a weapon but carrying on unarmed, or to suddenly find a weapon and instantly use it.

The competitions may be about “stick fighting” but FMA is about surviving by using whatever comes to hand. It’s about assuming the other guy is armed. It’s about adapting to any scenario.

We are lucky to have had coverage on the recent TV shows. Our own Doce Pares HQ in Cebu was visited in the BBC’s Mind, Body & Kick ass Moves and the History Channels Human Weapon. While Fight Quest remained in Manila showing Pekiti Tirsia and Modern Arnis. Where different aspects of our arts are being shown. But for more info come and visit us, look on you tube (Rapid Arnis have some good clips).

We are also hosting FMA master and Security Expert Steve Tappin in May. Expect to see how FMA is truly effective on the streets of Europe as Steve regularly travel to the worst spots in Europe to train their respective police and security forces.
I almost feel sorry for the criminals, almost.

Come to Steve’s seminar and see how your own training can be enhanced by the Filipino martial arts.

Wild Geese
any cause but our own

The Wrong End Of the Stick

I often find that peoples view of the Filipino Martial Arts is somewhat inaccurate. I hope here to put it right.

FMA otherwise known as Eskrima, Kali or Arnis are the fighting arts native to the Philippines, and are a complete combat method. Unfortunately the popular view of these arts is that it’s just “Stick Fighting”.

This was illustrated most clearly by the owner of the Martial Arts Academy when he offered to make up posters to advertise our class. Guess what we got.

Yep, you guessed it. “Learn Stick Fighting”

Now while we do train with sticks, no argument there, we also fight with sticks. This is the start point for any new FMAer, learn to swing a stick. But that’s just the beginning.

As I said it’s a complete fighting system used throughout the ages to fight off rival tribes and invasions (including Magellan and the Spanish and later the Japanese in world war 2), would stick fighting cover this.

No. Most people fail to see the unarmed combat, the knife/machete use and defence. The Filipino method is to teach you to instinctively use any weapon that comes to hand to fight against any weapon that comes at you. Be it a punch, kick, blade or blunt instrument. It is this versatility that attracted notable martial artists like Ed Parker, Bruce Lee and Dan Innosanto to add elements taken from Kali/Arnis and add it into their respective styles.

Within FMA there are many areas to cover and masters do specialise, Momoy Canete specialised in longer range Espada y Daga, Cacoy Canete specialised in close range stick fighting. Antonio Illustrisimo specialised in the blade, Joe Borces uses “eskrido” a combination of traditional FMA and Aikido/Judo methods.
But these are the masters. Any student must be able to defend themselves against unarmed and armed attacks while they themselves may or may not be armed.

I have my students fighting 1 on 1, 2 on 1, 2 on 2, every man for themselves and many other combo’s.
I have an unarmed guy fighting against a knife man, or a single stick fighting against double stick. We allow disarms but expect the fight to continue so a fight er becomes used to loosing a weapon but carrying on unarmed, or to suddenly find a weapon and instantly use it.

The competitions may be about “stick fighting” but FMA is about surviving by using whatever comes to hand. It’s about assuming the other guy is armed. It’s about adapting to any scenario.

We are lucky to have had coverage on the recent TV shows. Our own Doce Pares HQ in Cebu was visited in the BBC’s Mind, Body & Kick ass Moves and the History Channels Human Weapon. While Fight Quest remained in Manila showing Pekiti Tirsia and Modern Arnis. Where different aspects of our arts are being shown. But for more info come and visit us, look on you tube (Rapid Arnis have some good clips).

We are also hosting FMA master and Security Expert Steve Tappin in May. Expect to see how FMA is truly effective on the streets of Europe as Steve regularly travel to the worst spots in Europe to train their respective police and security forces.
I almost feel sorry for the criminals, almost.

Come to Steve’s seminar and see how your own training can be enhanced by the Filipino martial arts.

Wild Geese
any cause but our own

3rd British Filipino Martial Arts Festival

The last two FMA Festivals were incredible, this one promises to even bigger and better again.
To be able to get 16 of the top Filipino Martial Arts masters together on one room for the event of the year is simply not to be missed.
The event is fully supported by the British Council of Kali, Eskrima, Arnis Instructors (BCKEAI), which of course is supported by the Philippine Council.
What does that mean?
It means that every instructor has the backing of a genuine Filipino Grand master, there are no fakes here. If you want to increase your understanding of FMA or you just want to witness some of the best, not just in Britain, but world standard eskrimador’s, DO NOT miss this event.
Wild Geese Martial Arts are about good quality instruction, we don’t promote anything that we don’t think is worth while, or any products that we don’t use. That’s a promise.
So if we say the FMA festival is not to be missed, then IT IS NOT TO BE MISSED.
any cause but our own

PS Don’t forget that Steve Tappin of Escrima Concepts will be in Dublin on the 4&5th May. He will be presenting some of the best blade awareness and if you like “RBSD” style FMA. We all know the Filipino’s have some of the best weapon defence in the world, Steve has spent the time adjusting it to suit the European mindset. And yes, it’s been field tested.

Details: www.wildgeesema.com/WGMA-seminars.htm

3rd British Filipino Martial Arts Festival

The last two FMA Festivals were incredible, this one promises to even bigger and better again.
To be able to get 16 of the top Filipino Martial Arts masters together on one room for the event of the year is simply not to be missed.
The event is fully supported by the British Council of Kali, Eskrima, Arnis Instructors (BCKEAI), which of course is supported by the Philippine Council.
What does that mean?
It means that every instructor has the backing of a genuine Filipino Grand master, there are no fakes here. If you want to increase your understanding of FMA or you just want to witness some of the best, not just in Britain, but world standard eskrimador’s, DO NOT miss this event.
Wild Geese Martial Arts are about good quality instruction, we don’t promote anything that we don’t think is worth while, or any products that we don’t use. That’s a promise.
So if we say the FMA festival is not to be missed, then IT IS NOT TO BE MISSED.
any cause but our own

PS Don’t forget that Steve Tappin of Escrima Concepts will be in Dublin on the 4&5th May. He will be presenting some of the best blade awareness and if you like “RBSD” style FMA. We all know the Filipino’s have some of the best weapon defence in the world, Steve has spent the time adjusting it to suit the European mindset. And yes, it’s been field tested.

Details: www.wildgeesema.com/WGMA-seminars.htm

80% of Fights End Up On The Floor

True. But don’t forget that 90% start on the feet.

The truth is, if you’re awareness has failed and you find yourself in a situation that you can’t talk yourself out of, the chances are you’re on your feet (as are the antagonists).

This is where preemptive striking, power and accuracy will come into play. You want to know that when you make contact, it counts. The ground is the last place you want to be.

For this reason the majority of traditional martial arts are all stand up based, including kenpo and eskrima. Many Filipino’s have a very simple viewpoint of ground fighting, if you see people doing it, go over and stab one of them, or kick a few heads.

Does this mean we shouldn’t learn grappling, absolutely not. It is a very valuable skill, and great conditioning, but it is far from being the be all and end all I often see it touted as.

You won’t see finer grappling than in the octagon of the UFC. But on many occasions I’ve heard discussions with various mma’ers that go the way of “but most fights go to ground……”, “submissions are best….” etc, please note I hold mma in the highest regard and have a few of my own students actively involved in mma. But on the street these arguments are highly flawed.

My personal favorite UFC fighter is the former champion and UFC legend, Chuck Liddel.

Why?

He fights similar to a street fighter, avoiding going to ground and instead preferring to knock out the majority of his opponents. That and the fact that he’s also a Kenpo man. Chuck has great takedown defence and awesome striking power.

Rolling on the ground is great training, but do so for more than a second or two outside and you’ll have people putting the boot in on you from all sides. Submissions on the street are dangerous, it is much safer to strike with all you have and get the hell out of dodge.

Spend time on the heavy bag, incorporate power training (kettlebells are great for this), learn to hit from any angle with all your natural weapons (hammer fist, palm, knuckles, forearms, elbows etc..)with no wind up and full hip and body involvement. Train to strike from compromised positions where you have no space to swing, no leverage from your legs or one limb disabled.

And train to be accurate and relentless.

Wild Geese
any cause but our own

80% of Fights End Up On The Floor

True. But don’t forget that 90% start on the feet.

The truth is, if you’re awareness has failed and you find yourself in a situation that you can’t talk yourself out of, the chances are you’re on your feet (as are the antagonists).

This is where preemptive striking, power and accuracy will come into play. You want to know that when you make contact, it counts. The ground is the last place you want to be.

For this reason the majority of traditional martial arts are all stand up based, including kenpo and eskrima. Many Filipino’s have a very simple viewpoint of ground fighting, if you see people doing it, go over and stab one of them, or kick a few heads.

Does this mean we shouldn’t learn grappling, absolutely not. It is a very valuable skill, and great conditioning, but it is far from being the be all and end all I often see it touted as.

You won’t see finer grappling than in the octagon of the UFC. But on many occasions I’ve heard discussions with various mma’ers that go the way of “but most fights go to ground……”, “submissions are best….” etc, please note I hold mma in the highest regard and have a few of my own students actively involved in mma. But on the street these arguments are highly flawed.

My personal favorite UFC fighter is the former champion and UFC legend, Chuck Liddel.

Why?

He fights similar to a street fighter, avoiding going to ground and instead preferring to knock out the majority of his opponents. That and the fact that he’s also a Kenpo man. Chuck has great takedown defence and awesome striking power.

Rolling on the ground is great training, but do so for more than a second or two outside and you’ll have people putting the boot in on you from all sides. Submissions on the street are dangerous, it is much safer to strike with all you have and get the hell out of dodge.

Spend time on the heavy bag, incorporate power training (kettlebells are great for this), learn to hit from any angle with all your natural weapons (hammer fist, palm, knuckles, forearms, elbows etc..)with no wind up and full hip and body involvement. Train to strike from compromised positions where you have no space to swing, no leverage from your legs or one limb disabled.

And train to be accurate and relentless.

Wild Geese
any cause but our own