Category Archives: martial arts

Just a reminder – 2nd ound of the Irish Padded Stick Fighting Competition

 

2nd Round of the Irish Filipino Stick Fighting Competition 19 September 2009

 

Im pleased to say that Pat White will allow us to hold another stick fighting competition on the 19th September 2009 out in the Road Stone Sport & Social club along with his own competition Best of the Best. We are still in the early days of getting recognised for the Fillipino Martial Arts here in Ireland so this event will make a name for the Fillipno Martial Arts and soon we will be holding are own big events like Pat White`s Best of the Best and open the competition at a European level and standard in the near future.
 
I have attached an application form and the terms and condition of competing in the 2nd Round of the FMA Irish Nationals.
Registration and weigh in starts at 08:30am sharp with the first fight starting at 08:45am i hope. Any instructor who is competing does not have to pay in, you will have to inform the people at the reception who will be at the main entrance to the hall.
 

Rgds Ray

Chamber`s Acadmey of Martial Arts
Chinese & Filipino Martial Arts
Phone: 00 353 1 87 985 7495

www.chambersama.com
chambersofficeama@gmail.com

6 Wild Geese Updates

6 updates for the Wild Geese friends and Family:

  1. 1- Wild Geese Hoodies will soon be available, we have a trial order coming in shortly. They are black with White embroidery, great quality. Price will be in the region of €35.
    <—-Design will be something like the picture.

Continue reading 6 Wild Geese Updates

The Art of the Masters

Whats the most fundamental skill a martial artist must develop?
The skill that is a common thread regardless of the individuals style or syetem?

It’s what makes the master seem untouchable.
It’s why the novice is so unpredictable.

It’s the difference between effortlesly beating an opponent and being in a fight.

What is this great skill?

Timing.

At some point in out martial arts career we’ve al thought that we were a bit tasty and really put it up to our superiors in a sparring session.
More often than not we were put straight back in our box.
But if your coach is twice your age and half your size, how is it is seemingly untouchable and able to pick you off at will?
It’s his sense of timing, his ability to read the situation and move only as much as he needs and no more.

At Wild Geese, we’re all about effeciencey. You cannot be effecient without good timing.

So how do you learn this skill?
By learning to flow with a training partner. Free play and sparring are the keys to developing a keen sense of timing. Learning to move as he moves, when to exploit he openings and offering up your “openings” as a trap.

The Filipino’s use many such drills, as do Tai Chi, Wing Chun and many of the Chinese styles. BJJ players will also spend time “rolling” which is the same thing. Playing with the training partner with a predetermined level of resistance, attempting to apply various techniques while not falling victim to your opponents.
At first there should be complete cooperation between the partners so that a basic level of skill may be accomplished, then as that skill improves, the resistance should go up in response.

The end game is basically free sparring whee anything goes.

Although there is absolutely no need to rush to the anything goes stage. A degree of cooperation is necessarry in order to best develop the skills and techniques. All out sparring should be kept for special occaisions.

Add some flow into your own training and you will very quiclky see your abilities improve. You won’t have any new techniques bt you will lear when to best apply the techniques you have.

This is timing.

This is the art.

Regards

Wild Geese
every cause but our own
www.wildgeesema.com
info@wildgeesema.com
+353 87 672 6090
Newsletter-subscribe@wildgeesema.com

The Art of the Masters

Whats the most fundamental skill a martial artist must develop?
The skill that is a common thread regardless of the individuals style or syetem?

It’s what makes the master seem untouchable.
It’s why the novice is so unpredictable.

It’s the difference between effortlesly beating an opponent and being in a fight.

What is this great skill?

Timing.

At some point in out martial arts career we’ve al thought that we were a bit tasty and really put it up to our superiors in a sparring session.
More often than not we were put straight back in our box.
But if your coach is twice your age and half your size, how is it is seemingly untouchable and able to pick you off at will?
It’s his sense of timing, his ability to read the situation and move only as much as he needs and no more.

At Wild Geese, we’re all about effeciencey. You cannot be effecient without good timing.

So how do you learn this skill?
By learning to flow with a training partner. Free play and sparring are the keys to developing a keen sense of timing. Learning to move as he moves, when to exploit he openings and offering up your “openings” as a trap.

The Filipino’s use many such drills, as do Tai Chi, Wing Chun and many of the Chinese styles. BJJ players will also spend time “rolling” which is the same thing. Playing with the training partner with a predetermined level of resistance, attempting to apply various techniques while not falling victim to your opponents.
At first there should be complete cooperation between the partners so that a basic level of skill may be accomplished, then as that skill improves, the resistance should go up in response.

The end game is basically free sparring whee anything goes.

Although there is absolutely no need to rush to the anything goes stage. A degree of cooperation is necessarry in order to best develop the skills and techniques. All out sparring should be kept for special occaisions.

Add some flow into your own training and you will very quiclky see your abilities improve. You won’t have any new techniques bt you will lear when to best apply the techniques you have.

This is timing.

This is the art.

Regards

Wild Geese
every cause but our own
www.wildgeesema.com
info@wildgeesema.com
+353 87 672 6090
Newsletter-subscribe@wildgeesema.com

Total Self Defence

Go to a self defence course and you’ll usually get taught a hundred ways to damage a body.

Go to a self protection and you learn probably fewer ways to hurt people but also get a load of ways to avoid getting into trouble in the first place. Oh, and learn how to not be too upset about the ordeal afterwards.

Go to a martial arts class and you’ll get taught whatever interpretation of whatever some dead, probably Asian, guy used to defeat countless enemies.

But then take a look at the older and more esoteric systems. Particularly the Okinawan, Chinese, the lesser known Thai arts and Indian martial arts.
You’ll see a vastly different approach to what is often espoused today.

With the rise of the UFC, and “mixed martial arts” we have developed a blood sweat and tears mindset, an “if it don’t work in the ring/octagon, why bother with it” attitude.
Many non MMA’ers have turned to the so called “Reality Based” Self Defence, where the same blood sweat and tears mindset prevails. They think sports are silly and instead train for the fateful day society breaks down and we all have to wear combat pants, shave our heads and be dead ‘ard.

But there is something missing still.

The “real as it gets” MMA or the “Reality” self defence are still incomplete as self defence systems. They lack the elements made that the “old fashioned” systems complete.
Systems that these modern “warriors” seem to think are usless.

But self defence, and indeed the martial arts, are about much more than hurting people and fighting.
The term Self Defence can be defined as:

Defending oneself from harm using whatever means necessary

The word harm could be anything that would adversely affect your well being.
Not just a violent attack, but health issues, environmental issues, stress. Self Defence is about being ready and prepared to deal with anything.

Many of the more esoteric arts include support systems or training protocols that are designed keep the body and mind agile and strong, even into old age.
Meditation, Chi Gung and Yoga type programs would go hand in hand with the physical kick/punch training.
Hard would be balanced with soft.

It is these support systems that seem to have been forgotten in the quest for greater speed and knockout power. Yet if you wish to still be training well into your twilight years, it is these systems that will get you there.
The meditations and chi gungs will assist the body in recovering from the abuse of hard training, they will calm and focus the mind, they loosen and relax tense muscles and maintain a strong will and a disciplined, agile mind.

The esoteric or holistic systems start with the individual. There is no focus on anything external, be it opponents or muggers until the student has first gained mastery of themselves.

After all, are we not our own worst enemies?

Regards

Wild Geese
www.wildgeesema.com
www.noequipment.blogspot.com
+353 87 672 6090

Total Self Defence

Go to a self defence course and you’ll usually get taught a hundred ways to damage a body.

Go to a self protection and you learn probably fewer ways to hurt people but also get a load of ways to avoid getting into trouble in the first place. Oh, and learn how to not be too upset about the ordeal afterwards.

Go to a martial arts class and you’ll get taught whatever interpretation of whatever some dead, probably Asian, guy used to defeat countless enemies.

But then take a look at the older and more esoteric systems. Particularly the Okinawan, Chinese, the lesser known Thai arts and Indian martial arts.
You’ll see a vastly different approach to what is often espoused today.

With the rise of the UFC, and “mixed martial arts” we have developed a blood sweat and tears mindset, an “if it don’t work in the ring/octagon, why bother with it” attitude.
Many non MMA’ers have turned to the so called “Reality Based” Self Defence, where the same blood sweat and tears mindset prevails. They think sports are silly and instead train for the fateful day society breaks down and we all have to wear combat pants, shave our heads and be dead ‘ard.

But there is something missing still.

The “real as it gets” MMA or the “Reality” self defence are still incomplete as self defence systems. They lack the elements made that the “old fashioned” systems complete.
Systems that these modern “warriors” seem to think are usless.

But self defence, and indeed the martial arts, are about much more than hurting people and fighting.
The term Self Defence can be defined as:

Defending oneself from harm using whatever means necessary

The word harm could be anything that would adversely affect your well being.
Not just a violent attack, but health issues, environmental issues, stress. Self Defence is about being ready and prepared to deal with anything.

Many of the more esoteric arts include support systems or training protocols that are designed keep the body and mind agile and strong, even into old age.
Meditation, Chi Gung and Yoga type programs would go hand in hand with the physical kick/punch training.
Hard would be balanced with soft.

It is these support systems that seem to have been forgotten in the quest for greater speed and knockout power. Yet if you wish to still be training well into your twilight years, it is these systems that will get you there.
The meditations and chi gungs will assist the body in recovering from the abuse of hard training, they will calm and focus the mind, they loosen and relax tense muscles and maintain a strong will and a disciplined, agile mind.

The esoteric or holistic systems start with the individual. There is no focus on anything external, be it opponents or muggers until the student has first gained mastery of themselves.

After all, are we not our own worst enemies?

Regards

Wild Geese
www.wildgeesema.com
www.noequipment.blogspot.com
+353 87 672 6090

It’s Not What You Know

It’s how well you know it.

As martial artists grow and gain experience they are often looking for the next new piece of info, the newest technique, the next drill.

In fact the opposite should be done. Strip away the excess, loose the junk and use the extra time to work on the things that really work.

Forget fancy, go for simple. Review the techniques and drills you have, are they of any use? Will they work for you in the real world? It will nearly always the things you learned when you were a white belt.
Why do we get taught fancy stuff? Usually to keep students interested, that’s not completely true. Advanced techniques are necessary, but they should build directly on the foundation of the basics, they should be ways of making the basics more effective, not replacing them.

If strength and fitness are included in your training (and why wouldn’t they be?) then the problem is compounded further. Just open a muscle magazine or look on youtube for some of the weirdest exercises ever conceived. Things that do nothing more than waste time that could be better spent on more productive endeavours.
The funniest are from the “functional fitness” people, but they will never be as functionally fit or strong as a grappler/boxer or strongman competitor who does non of the strange circus tricks often advocated (Bent over rows while balancing on a bosu ball anyone?)

Stick to the basics. Get results. End of.

PS Don’t forget, No Equipment, No Excuses – Bodyweight training for the home, office or on the road is on special offer for the next two weeks only, get it while it’s cheap!It will show you the best bodyweight only drills to complement your daily life, with progressions from beginner to advanced, with no fancy b*ll*cks.

Regards

Wild Geese
every cause but our own
Kenpo / Eskrima / BJJ / Strength & Conditioning
www.wildgeesema.com/ wildgeesema.blogspot.com
info@wildgeesema.com
+353 87 672 6090
Facebook / Twitter / RSS feed

It’s Not What You Know

It’s how well you know it.

As martial artists grow and gain experience they are often looking for the next new piece of info, the newest technique, the next drill.

In fact the opposite should be done. Strip away the excess, loose the junk and use the extra time to work on the things that really work.

Forget fancy, go for simple. Review the techniques and drills you have, are they of any use? Will they work for you in the real world? It will nearly always the things you learned when you were a white belt.
Why do we get taught fancy stuff? Usually to keep students interested, that’s not completely true. Advanced techniques are necessary, but they should build directly on the foundation of the basics, they should be ways of making the basics more effective, not replacing them.

If strength and fitness are included in your training (and why wouldn’t they be?) then the problem is compounded further. Just open a muscle magazine or look on youtube for some of the weirdest exercises ever conceived. Things that do nothing more than waste time that could be better spent on more productive endeavours.
The funniest are from the “functional fitness” people, but they will never be as functionally fit or strong as a grappler/boxer or strongman competitor who does non of the strange circus tricks often advocated (Bent over rows while balancing on a bosu ball anyone?)

Stick to the basics. Get results. End of.

PS Don’t forget, No Equipment, No Excuses – Bodyweight training for the home, office or on the road is on special offer for the next two weeks only, get it while it’s cheap!It will show you the best bodyweight only drills to complement your daily life, with progressions from beginner to advanced, with no fancy b*ll*cks.

Regards

Wild Geese
every cause but our own
Kenpo / Eskrima / BJJ / Strength & Conditioning
www.wildgeesema.com/ wildgeesema.blogspot.com
info@wildgeesema.com
+353 87 672 6090
Facebook / Twitter / RSS feed