Category Archives: martial arts

Do you run with the herd?

Ever watch the discovery channel? How about David Attenborough shows?

Do you notice how the predators always pick out the weakest in the heard and focus all of their attacking focus and power onto that single individual.

People aren’t much different. I have my students play games. I give them homework. I ask them that when they are on their way home, look around them and check out the herd, see if they can pick out the weakest, who would they hunt if they were the predator.

The object of the exercise is twofold. On one hand the students are learning what it is that a potential attacker looks for, while on the other it raises their awareness level in order to spot potential threats.

By putting themselves into the mind of a hunter, they can see other peoples weaknesses and learn to avoid the same mistakes that they are seeing around them.
Plus simply being more aware of those around them makes them instantly less attractive to an attacker.

Think about it, two people walking along, identical size, gender dress etc except one has their head down, earphones in and are obviously daydreaming, the other is walking tall and striding confidently.

You are looking for an easy target, which of them would you choose?

Enough said.

Separate yourself from the herd, don’t be a target.

Wild Geese
www.wildgeesema.com
www.wg-fit.com
any cause but our own

Do you run with the herd?

Ever watch the discovery channel? How about David Attenborough shows?

Do you notice how the predators always pick out the weakest in the heard and focus all of their attacking focus and power onto that single individual.

People aren’t much different. I have my students play games. I give them homework. I ask them that when they are on their way home, look around them and check out the herd, see if they can pick out the weakest, who would they hunt if they were the predator.

The object of the exercise is twofold. On one hand the students are learning what it is that a potential attacker looks for, while on the other it raises their awareness level in order to spot potential threats.

By putting themselves into the mind of a hunter, they can see other peoples weaknesses and learn to avoid the same mistakes that they are seeing around them.
Plus simply being more aware of those around them makes them instantly less attractive to an attacker.

Think about it, two people walking along, identical size, gender dress etc except one has their head down, earphones in and are obviously daydreaming, the other is walking tall and striding confidently.

You are looking for an easy target, which of them would you choose?

Enough said.

Separate yourself from the herd, don’t be a target.

Wild Geese
www.wildgeesema.com
www.wg-fit.com
any cause but our own

A Reductionist Approach to Fitness?

This is a guest post from fellow scotsman, martial artist and trainer Alwyn Cosgrove. Alwyn may have crossed over to the darkside by moving to the politically correct US, but he still doesn’t mind his P’s and Q’s when it comes to talking about the state of the fitness industry.

Read on…

Wednesday, June 25, 2008

A Reductionist Approach to Fitness?

In 1993 the ultimate fighting championship was created.

The initial concept was to determine which martial art – under a no holds barred scenario was superior.

It was karate vs judo vs wrestling vs boxing etc.

Fast forward 15 years…..

We no longer talk about martial art styles — we talk about MIXED martial arts. It’s a mainstream term.

We no longer use the term ‘style’ to describe a fighter — we say “he has good stand-up” or a “good ground game”.

Because martial arts have evolved and have embraced a totality.

Styles were a reductionist approach.

A strong guy went to wrestling. A good striker went to kickboxing etc….

But a holistic or total approach to fighting was always superior. And it’s a mixed system.

Bruce Lee advocated this (he died in 1973)……

“Absorb what is useful, reject what is useless”.
“Accept no way as the way, accept no limitation as limitation”

Here we are, 35 years later and the martial arts world has embraced that ideology completely.

But the fitness world is still arguing about which method is better – powerlifting vs olympic lifting, aerobics vs bodybuilding…

We need to evolve from this reductionist approach…

–AC

www.alwyncosgrove.com

Wild Geese
www.WildGeesMA.com
www.WG-Fit.com
any cause but our own

A Reductionist Approach to Fitness?

This is a guest post from fellow scotsman, martial artist and trainer Alwyn Cosgrove. Alwyn may have crossed over to the darkside by moving to the politically correct US, but he still doesn’t mind his P’s and Q’s when it comes to talking about the state of the fitness industry.

Read on…

Wednesday, June 25, 2008

A Reductionist Approach to Fitness?

In 1993 the ultimate fighting championship was created.

The initial concept was to determine which martial art – under a no holds barred scenario was superior.

It was karate vs judo vs wrestling vs boxing etc.

Fast forward 15 years…..

We no longer talk about martial art styles — we talk about MIXED martial arts. It’s a mainstream term.

We no longer use the term ‘style’ to describe a fighter — we say “he has good stand-up” or a “good ground game”.

Because martial arts have evolved and have embraced a totality.

Styles were a reductionist approach.

A strong guy went to wrestling. A good striker went to kickboxing etc….

But a holistic or total approach to fighting was always superior. And it’s a mixed system.

Bruce Lee advocated this (he died in 1973)……

“Absorb what is useful, reject what is useless”.
“Accept no way as the way, accept no limitation as limitation”

Here we are, 35 years later and the martial arts world has embraced that ideology completely.

But the fitness world is still arguing about which method is better – powerlifting vs olympic lifting, aerobics vs bodybuilding…

We need to evolve from this reductionist approach…

–AC

www.alwyncosgrove.com

Wild Geese
www.WildGeesMA.com
www.WG-Fit.com
any cause but our own

Similar Differences

I was just reading a post on the Applied Strength Blog entitled “Contradictions and Situational Correctness”. In it Brett Jones discusses how bogged down people get when discussing training methods.

Now while Brett is discussing strength and conditioning, his comments ring true in the world of Martial Arts.

I constantly hear students talking about the differences between one style and another, but very rarely will I hear a discussion on the similarities. Take Karate for example, you’re either a Shotokan or WadoRyu man. Are you? They both developed from the same source, have mostly the same kata, same techniques and if you look at the kanji, before it is transliterated into English, the same names. But yet the two camps will not see eye to eye.

In the kenpo studio, Ed Parker’s syllabus is lengthy, but if you look at it, most of the techniques are merely variations on earlier ones. Except the counter strike is low instead of high, or you step with the left foot not the right or add this bit off that one to the end of this one. In other words, you explore the possibilities in a structured manner preparing you for the chaos of a real fight.

And yet I constantly hear students and some black belt “instructors” saying how each technique is unique and different to all the others.

I personally have attended lessons in Wing Chun, Wado Ryu, Shotokan, Tai Chi, Doce Pares Eskrima, Rapid Arnis, Balintawak Eskrima, Shaolin Kempo, Goshin Jitsu, Aikido and a few others. And you know what, it’s all the same stuff done differently. Body mechanics are body mechanics, it’s just one mans preference of how to apply them.
Be it the upright Wing Chun or the sweeping circles of Aikido, the hips generate power to either strike or snap an opponent.

Take heed of an old mantra “methods are many, principles are few”, look for the underlying principles and forget about whether your fist is held vertically or horizontally, it doesn’t matter if there’s no hip, no focus or your face is being smashed up while you try figure it out.

Wild Geese Martial Arts encourage students to think for themselves, whatever they are learning from us. If they are learning eskrima, we’ll show them differing styles of doing the same thing, if it’s kenpo we’ll encourage students to explore outside of the strict syllabus. Sure if you watch Paul and I, we even do things different to each other on an aesthetic front. The end result is the same though.

Stop getting lost in the details, as Bruce Lee said (and I hate quoting Bruce):
Before I studied the art, a punch to me was just a punch, a kick was just a kick. After I’d studied the art, a punch was no longer a punch, a kick no longer a kick. Now that I understand the art, a punch is just a punch, a kick is just a kick.

Wild Geese
http://www.wildgeesema.com/
http://www.wg-fit.com/
any cause but our own

Similar Differences

I was just reading a post on the Applied Strength Blog entitled “Contradictions and Situational Correctness”. In it Brett Jones discusses how bogged down people get when discussing training methods.

Now while Brett is discussing strength and conditioning, his comments ring true in the world of Martial Arts.

I constantly hear students talking about the differences between one style and another, but very rarely will I hear a discussion on the similarities. Take Karate for example, you’re either a Shotokan or WadoRyu man. Are you? They both developed from the same source, have mostly the same kata, same techniques and if you look at the kanji, before it is transliterated into English, the same names. But yet the two camps will not see eye to eye.

In the kenpo studio, Ed Parker’s syllabus is lengthy, but if you look at it, most of the techniques are merely variations on earlier ones. Except the counter strike is low instead of high, or you step with the left foot not the right or add this bit off that one to the end of this one. In other words, you explore the possibilities in a structured manner preparing you for the chaos of a real fight.

And yet I constantly hear students and some black belt “instructors” saying how each technique is unique and different to all the others.

I personally have attended lessons in Wing Chun, Wado Ryu, Shotokan, Tai Chi, Doce Pares Eskrima, Rapid Arnis, Balintawak Eskrima, Shaolin Kempo, Goshin Jitsu, Aikido and a few others. And you know what, it’s all the same stuff done differently. Body mechanics are body mechanics, it’s just one mans preference of how to apply them.
Be it the upright Wing Chun or the sweeping circles of Aikido, the hips generate power to either strike or snap an opponent.

Take heed of an old mantra “methods are many, principles are few”, look for the underlying principles and forget about whether your fist is held vertically or horizontally, it doesn’t matter if there’s no hip, no focus or your face is being smashed up while you try figure it out.

Wild Geese Martial Arts encourage students to think for themselves, whatever they are learning from us. If they are learning eskrima, we’ll show them differing styles of doing the same thing, if it’s kenpo we’ll encourage students to explore outside of the strict syllabus. Sure if you watch Paul and I, we even do things different to each other on an aesthetic front. The end result is the same though.

Stop getting lost in the details, as Bruce Lee said (and I hate quoting Bruce):
Before I studied the art, a punch to me was just a punch, a kick was just a kick. After I’d studied the art, a punch was no longer a punch, a kick no longer a kick. Now that I understand the art, a punch is just a punch, a kick is just a kick.

Wild Geese
http://www.wildgeesema.com/
http://www.wg-fit.com/
any cause but our own

Wild Geese @ The Martial Arts Academy

Wild Geese Martial Arts and our newer Personal Training and fitness wing will now be operating full time out of Dublin’s Martial Arts Academy.

At the academy we run regular Filipino Martial Arts, Anti Stab knife defence and Control & Restraint classes and courses.

We also have a selection of basic strength equipment, Barbells, plate loaded dumbells, a selection of kettlebells as well as some of the best conditioning tools ever invented, skipping ropes and punchbags.

So if you fancy training in a non conventional gym under the watchful eye of a qualified and experienced trainer using the types of methods used by fighters and old time strong men to forge physiques like stone and near legendary conditioning levels.

We offer Personal Training, Semi Private training and Supervised training.
Personal Training – You, Me and your personalised program, be it Martial Arts, Self defence, strength, weight loss and fitness. This runs at €50/hr
Semi Private – Bring a friend, up to a maximum of 6. You will then help and hinder each other to accelerate the results in the field you choose, strength, fitness or fighting. We charge €70/hr for the first 2 people with an extra €10 per person up to a max of 6.
Supervised Training – Come in and do your own training under our watchful eye for a nominal fee. Simply €10/hr or €50 per month.

You may combine packages to suit, and if you block pay for classes you can use them as you wish.
For example pay €100 and get 1 hr personal training and 1 month supervised training
or
Pay €100 and get 1 month supervised training and jump into 5 scheduled Wild Geese Martial Arts classes

For a map to our location click here:

http://maps.dublinbynumbers.com/visiting-dublin-map-gyms.html#

We are number 19. Alternatively visit our websites listed below.

Regards

Dave
Wild Geese
http://www.wg-fit.com/
http://www.wildgeesema.com/
any cause but our own

Wild Geese @ The Martial Arts Academy

Wild Geese Martial Arts and our newer Personal Training and fitness wing will now be operating full time out of Dublin’s Martial Arts Academy.

At the academy we run regular Filipino Martial Arts, Anti Stab knife defence and Control & Restraint classes and courses.

We also have a selection of basic strength equipment, Barbells, plate loaded dumbells, a selection of kettlebells as well as some of the best conditioning tools ever invented, skipping ropes and punchbags.

So if you fancy training in a non conventional gym under the watchful eye of a qualified and experienced trainer using the types of methods used by fighters and old time strong men to forge physiques like stone and near legendary conditioning levels.

We offer Personal Training, Semi Private training and Supervised training.
Personal Training – You, Me and your personalised program, be it Martial Arts, Self defence, strength, weight loss and fitness. This runs at €50/hr
Semi Private – Bring a friend, up to a maximum of 6. You will then help and hinder each other to accelerate the results in the field you choose, strength, fitness or fighting. We charge €70/hr for the first 2 people with an extra €10 per person up to a max of 6.
Supervised Training – Come in and do your own training under our watchful eye for a nominal fee. Simply €10/hr or €50 per month.

You may combine packages to suit, and if you block pay for classes you can use them as you wish.
For example pay €100 and get 1 hr personal training and 1 month supervised training
or
Pay €100 and get 1 month supervised training and jump into 5 scheduled Wild Geese Martial Arts classes

For a map to our location click here:

http://maps.dublinbynumbers.com/visiting-dublin-map-gyms.html#

We are number 19. Alternatively visit our websites listed below.

Regards

Dave
Wild Geese
http://www.wg-fit.com/
http://www.wildgeesema.com/
any cause but our own

Old School Core Training

Old school seems to be back in vogue, crunches are on the way out and real core strength is on the way back in, hence the popularity of Kettlebells and Jim Smith’s excellent work www.CombatCore.com

Here’s an exercise that’s been around for generations in the martial arts world. Fighters need a strong core, both for generating and for absorbing power. To this end kata’s/form’s such as Seisan and Sanchin were devised, I demo seisan here:

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FW3knrDSw_A&hl=en]

Fans of Dragon Door will recognise the first section of the form is based around “Power Breathing”, the second section is more about releasing the pent up tension. Oh and you get to practice your fighting techniques while you’re at it, how’s that for functional training?

Wild Geese
www.wildgeesema.com
www.WG-Fit.com
any cause but our own

Old School Core Training

Old school seems to be back in vogue, crunches are on the way out and real core strength is on the way back in, hence the popularity of Kettlebells and Jim Smith’s excellent work www.CombatCore.com

Here’s an exercise that’s been around for generations in the martial arts world. Fighters need a strong core, both for generating and for absorbing power. To this end kata’s/form’s such as Seisan and Sanchin were devised, I demo seisan here:

Fans of Dragon Door will recognise the first section of the form is based around “Power Breathing”, the second section is more about releasing the pent up tension. Oh and you get to practice your fighting techniques while you’re at it, how’s that for functional training?

Wild Geese
www.wildgeesema.com
www.WG-Fit.com
any cause but our own