Category Archives: non-conventional training

New Articles – Bodyweight training for Mass Gains

I’ve just updated www.wg-fit.com with three new articles from one of the most innovative trainers I’ve come across, Nick Nilsson.

While all three articles offer great info, it was the one he wrote titled Time/Volume training for mass. He talks about turning normal “calisthenic” bodyweight exercises into mass building exercises.

Now as a trainer and martial arts instructor I’m often asked about training, strength and fitness and one question that comes up regularly is “How can I train effectively at home?”

The answer of course is bodyweight. However, after a time your own bodyweight won’t be enough to get a good mass building workout. That is, until now!

Get over to www.wg-fit.com/Articles/timevolumetrainingformass.htm for details of how to use the ultimate home gym (your own body) to add inches of muscle to your frame.

Enjoy

Wild Geese
www.wg-fit.com
www.wildgeesema.com
every cause but our own

Loose the Shoes

Pavel Tstasouline says it, Steve Maxwell insists on it, power lifters, gymnasts and martial artists don’t think twice about it.

Train barefoot, or as close as you can to it.

Get some martial art shoes, power lifting slippers, converse, cheap squash shoes, dunlops green flash, or even, if your a hard core strength type a pair of flip flops.

Me, I like to go natural, no shoes or socks.

Now obviously employ some common sense here. I’m not talking about going out pounding the pavement or something similar, I’m talking about in the gym, on the weight room floor or in your own home.

But why?

There are a multitude of sensors, nerves and muscles in the foot that when encased in your top of the range Nike Air trainers, just don’t need to work. They get lazy and like anything else in the body, get weak.

This can lead to a whole range of problems right up the body from collapsed arches, shin and knee pain, sciatic pain, hip misalignment, back and neck pain.

The usually prescription is orthotics. I say get the shoes off and get the feet strong, allow the sensors and proprioceptors the option of working. These sensors in the foot let the rest of the body know whats going on, how to balance, what impact to brace for, how much force to contract with.

Much is written about the “ends of the chain”, usually meaning grip strength, but little is released regarding foot strength. After all what is it that takes all the weight?
You got it, the things you stand on, your feet.

I have an athlete training with me, she suffers arthritic knee pain. Since loosing the shoes in the gym she’s noticed strength and stability increases that take pressure off the knees. And that was within a week of me suggesting it. Her arches are beginning to reform (they were half way collapsed) her ankles no longer roll inwards and her balance it far, far better then it ever was. She can’t believe the difference.

Don’t just take my word on this, try it out. Get the shoes off before you get under the bar, let me know how you get on.

Dave

Wild Geese
www.wildgeesema.com
www.wg-fit.com
every cause but our own

The Next Level of Core Support

Since I got a copy of Jim Smiths recent book “Combat Core”
i’ve been posting articles and informatin that he’s been kind enough to send through to me.

Jim is a Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist and an expert trainer who writes for Men’s Fitness and the Elite Q/A Staff etc, he has been involved in strength training as a performance enhancement specialist for over 8 years and has worked with athletes from various sports who compete at various levels and is on of the founding members of a group of lunatics collectivley known as the Diesel Crew.
He has published many articles about his unique training style and innovative methods for many prominent strength and fitness related sites and also the authored of three renowned strength manuals.

I’ve just posted his latest article, The Next Level of Core Support – Dynamic Planks, on my WG-Fit.com site. In it Jim takes one of those useless mini trampoline things and turns it into an instrument of torture.

Have a look if you dare……

Wild Geese
any cause but our own

More Effective Muscle Building Workouts

By Jason Ferrugia
www.musclegainingsecrets.com

Why is it that almost all of the muscle building workouts you read about advocate body-part splits? Monday is chest day, Tuesday is back, Thursday is legs and Friday is arms…or something like that, I guess.

Why does everyone just do what everyone else is doing and follow the herd like a bunch of sheep without stopping to ever consider why?

You need to understand that most forms of muscle building workouts have just been passed down for decades from one generation to the next, without the inclusion of rational thought. Sometime in the 60’s, sensible muscle building workouts started becoming less and less prevalent with the rapidly growing usage of anabolic steroids.

In the days of old, men like Steve Reeves and Paul Anderson trained with far more reasonable, lower volume programs. Unfortunately these smarter muscle building workouts started to disappear during the 60’s. By the time Arnold got to Gold’s Gym in Venice for the first time, high volume, body-part splits were the widely accepted way for everyone to train for size and strength.

These types of muscle building workouts are not based on deductive reasoning but just on the fact that “it’s what everyone else is doing.” The proponents of these training methods will always blindly tell you that “higher volume training is needed for hypertrophy gains.” Says who? I can tell you for a fact that the University of Chicago isn’t wasting time examining the effects of Jay Cutler’s marathon workouts. There are no studies saying that you need 8-12 sets per body-part to grow. In fact there are studies that show the opposite; that one set is just as effective as three.

The proponents of this type of training will also tell you that higher volume training is associated with higher levels of growth hormone secretion. What they don’t tell you is that the level of GH increase is not enough to make any difference at all. In fact, almost anything you do elevates GH. Extreme temperatures elevate GH but my biceps don’t get bigger every time I take a shower. The increased GH secretion from training is so minimal that it is not enough to make the slightest difference whatsoever.

For the drug free lifter who does not possess muscle building genetics quite up to par with the current Mr. Olypia, training this way is a huge mistake. Not only does it drain your amino acid pool and glycogen stores but it dramatically enhances your recovery time between workouts. If you do 8-12 sets for chest on Monday you can not recover from that workout and be able to train again for seven days. So you are only getting one growth stimulus per week or fifty two per year. Now if you reduce your volume to the point where you can recover faster and more efficiently without draining your amino acid pool and glycogen stores so greatly, you can train bodyparts twice per week instead of once. Now instead of 52 muscle building workouts per year for each bodypart, you can now do 104. In fact, if your volume is kept low you can even get away with training bodyparts three times a week in certain situations. Now, which do you think will be more effective; 156 muscle building workouts per year or 52?

To train more often you absolutely have to lower your training volume. The total sets per workout should be kept low and the total sets per exercise should be even lower. There is no need to hit four sets of incline presses, flat bench presses and decline presses for your chest workout. Doing that is a form of neuroses; you think that you need to hit every angle and do and endless amount of sets to stimulate every last muscle fiber, but this is simply not the case.

The reason these types of muscle building workouts remain popular is because nobody wants to be told that they are wrong. Admitting your mistakes is something many people can’t do. It is why when something radically different is proposed, the high volume proponents get upset and offended. Nobody likes to have their ego bruised so they keep on doing and promoting the same old high volume workouts that they always have.

That’s fine, let them continue to do what they choose; personally I have way more important things to do than spend all of my waking hours in the gym. If I can get better results in a fraction of the time with short, highly effective muscle building workouts, I will choose that option every time.

Cut your volume down, up your weights and intensity and get ready for the “what are you on” questions to start rolling in.

Jason Ferruggia is a world famous fitness expert who is renowned for his ability to help people build muscle as fast as humanly possible. He is the head training adviser for Men’s Fitness Magazine where he also has his own monthly column dedicated to muscle building. For More Effecive Muscle Building Workout tips, check out www.musclegainingsecrets.com

Wild Geese
any cause but our own

Brutal Wall Walking for Serious Power

By Jim Smith, CSCS
http://wildgeese.dieselcrew.hop.clickbank.net/

Hand balancing and other gymnastic movements were used by the old-time strongmen such as Eugen Sandow, Otto Arco and Sig Klein. As you know, these physical culturalists had some of the strongest and most ripped abdominals ever displayed. In fact, some of their feats of strength have yet to be equaled. What most don’t realize is that these men used gymnastics and simple bodyweight movements to build their insane strength.

A movement that I utilize with my wrestlers and combat athletes is wall walking. It is one segment of the full execution of walking on your hands. The full version of walking on your hands takes a while to really get the hang of, so working the same musculature but with a more rudimentary movement is easy and quicker to implement.

Wall walking involves having the athlete setup in a hand stand position against a wall. From there, they will walk their hands out until their body is parallel to the ground. To complete the movement, they begin walking their feet back up, returning to the starting position close to the wall. That is one rep. Continue walking out and walking back up the wall for the desired volume or until the athlete collapses!

Building huge upper body strength, elite levels of torso strength and helping to regulate breathing, wall walking will without a doubt provide your athletes with a truly brutal exercise that will have them crushing their opponents.

About the Author
Jim Smith is a Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist and an expert trainer who writes for Men’s Fitness and the Elite Q/A Staff. Jim has been involved in strength training as a performance enhancement specialist for over 8 years and has worked with athletes from various sports who compete at various levels. He has published articles about his unique training style and innovative methods for many prominent strength and fitness related sites. He is also the authored of three renowned strength manuals. For more innovative training solutions, visit
http://wildgeese.dieselcrew.hop.clickbank.net/.

For real core strength, check out:

http://wildgeese.dieselcrew.hop.clickbank.net/

Wild Geese
any cause but our own

Interview With Jim Smith, CSCS – Author of Combat Core

By line: By Dave Hedges
www.CombatCoreStrength.com.

Wild Geese are always on the lookout for new, updated informatio not just in the martial arts but also the fitness industry. When looking at fitness training we look from the stand point of a fighter and martial artist, in other words no BS, effecient, effective training with real, functional results.
I recently had a chance to sit down with Jim Smith, CSCS of the Diesel Crew and the author of Combat Core. I was able to get the low down on his new product and talk to him about what “real” core strength is all about.

[DH] Question: Jim, First off, thanks for the interview. What do you think is the biggest mistake most trainers make when trying to develop core strength?

[JS] Most trainers focus on what I have dubbed building strength of movement patterns. What they fail to realize is that this is only one piece of the total puzzle. Building strength in the gym with movements like leg lifts, sit-ups, reverse sit-ups and so on…is a compliment to a bigger, more comprehensive core strength program. There are other criteria that make up the rest of the pyramid that I have established in Combat Core

[DH] Question: What, in your opinion, is the biggest myth concerning abdominal programs?

[JS] For trainers, I would point to my previous response. For the general public and even athletes, I would say that they believe that “more is better.” They believe, if they do 1000 crunches each workout, they will get ripped abs. Of course, the real answer is that being able to display a sick set of abs is the direct result of low body fat levels. If you want abs, you better get the fat off that is covering them.

[DH] Question: How does core strength affect back pain and posture?

[JS] Your abdominals and back musculature work together to stabilize and protect the spine, hips and pelvis. If any of these muscle groups (and surrounding structures) are weak, posture is affected and sometimes the muscles (groups) become inhibited which causes the secondary movers to become overactive or on-tension. This will inevitably lead to injury and poor performance. Building torso strength by incorporating compound exercises that activate many muscle groups at the same time, teaches the lifter or athlete to move their body as a single, coordinated unit. Isolated exercises tend to lead to imbalances if used too much.

[DH] Question: How has your abdominal training strategies changed over the years?

[JS] I used to think that by throwing in a couple sets of sit-ups or leg raises at the end of the workout was enough torso strengthening work. But over the years as I have gained experience and continued to study performance, I have developed a new, more comprehensive training model specific to athletes. The same attention and effort that you put in to planning your primary training sessions, you must also spend on designing your core training strategies.

About the Author
Jim Smith is a Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist who writes for Men’s Fitness and the Elite Q/A Staff. Jim has been involved in strength training as a performance enhancement specialist for over 8 years and has worked with athletes from various sports who compete at various levels. He has published articles about his unique training style and innovative methods for many prominent strength and fitness related sites. He is also the authored of three renowned strength manuals. For more innovative training solutions, visit www.CombatCoreStrength.com. .

For real core strength, check out:
www.CombatCoreStrength.com.