Category Archives: self defence

Knife Management – Dublin 30th June – 01st July

This is NOT to be missed

Mick Coup, the man behind the world renowned Core Combatives self defence training system is coming to Wild Geese to teach his Knife Management 2 day seminar.

Or in his own words:

For more details:



Here’s the full course brief:

Knife Management #1 (Active Threat)

Aim:
To present workable strategies, tactics and techniques to reduce, counter, and survive a worst-case continuous assault by an assailant with a knife or similar weapon.

Scope:
A hostile, committed, close-proximity adversary armed with a knife represents the worst-case personal combat scenario. No guarantees can be provided – reducing lethality, increasing survivability, and improving reactive-countermeasure options are the overall focus of this seminar.

Content:
• Weapon Carry & Access Indicators
• Pre-Emptive Impact Options
• Draw Obstruction & Interruption
• Attack Interception & Stabilisation
• Post-Incident Checks & Self-Aid

Format:
There will be progressive, continual force-on-force drilling, involving light to substantial impact, utilising a combination of protective equipment and solid training weapons, and incorporating full-resistance grappling.

Duration:
The seminar will be delivered over a 4-5 hour period, inclusive of breaks.

Dress & Equipment:
Comfortable training clothes, indoor non-marking footwear essential, ensure nothing is worn that might injure a training partner. Personal protective equipment such as gumshields and groin protectors are mandatory. Note-taking material and fluids are recommended.

Eligibility:
Pre-attendance of Combat Management and Contact Management seminars, and/or the Foundation Course, is strongly recommended but not essential. Ages over 18 only.

Knife Management #2 (Passive Threat)

Aim:
To present workable strategies, tactics and techniques to address the presence of a knife or similar weapon, where an assault is not yet in-progress.

Scope:
The presence of a knife being brandished at close-proximity, for the purpose of intimidation and coercion, or as a precursor to an active physical assault, presents a limited window of opportunity for effective active-countermeasure options – and these are the focus of this seminar.

Content:
• Contact Management Assessment
• Weapon Containment & Control
• Positional & Postural Dominance
• Impactive Countermeasures
• Post-Incident Checks & Self-Aid

Format:
There will be progressive, continual force-on-force drilling, involving light to substantial impact, utilising a combination of protective equipment and solid training weapons, and incorporating full-resistance grappling.

Duration:
The seminar will be delivered over a 4-5 hour period, inclusive of breaks.

Dress & Equipment:
Comfortable training clothes, indoor non-marking footwear essential, ensure nothing is worn that might injure a training partner. Personal protective equipment such as gumshields and groin protectors are mandatory. Note-taking material and fluids are recommended.

Eligibility:
Pre-attendance of Combat Management and Contact Management seminars, and/or the Foundation Course, is strongly recommended but not essential. Ages over 18 only.

If this of interest to you and you wish to receive more information, email us using the following contact form.



Get in touch ASAP

regards

the Wild Geese team

Out with the Dodo

In conversation this week two things have become a recurring theme. Two things that seem to have gone out of fashion and are in danger of being relegated to the history books, just like the Dodo.

The two items in question have been essential tools in the furthering of our species since time began, they are two of the things that made us top of the food chain and without which we will start to slide back down it again. We may no longer be worried about a sabre toothed tiger hunting us down, but we sure as hell ought to be concerned about a mugger, rapist, junkie or scumbag having a go.

So what two things am I talking about?

Common Sense and Personal Responsibility.

We’ve spoken about common sense on many occasions, it is the master sense, the 6th sense that allows us to act appropriately to the information gathered by the other 5 senses.Without common sense we are stupid and irrational, impulsive and illogical, which is all well and good in a safe environment, but ridiculously dangerous and irresponsible any where else. Such as on the streets on a Friday night.

So what about personal responsibility? What’s that got to do with anything?
Simple. You are responsible for your own safety. You alone, nobody else.

As a society we look to blame everyone else for everything. A person scolds themselves with a coffee they’d just bought from a fast food store, so they sue the store and win. Read that back, THEY scolded THEMSELVES with a COFFEE that THEY had just bought.Yet they were allowed to pass the blame onto the vendor. They took no responsibility for their own actions. It is common sense that coffee will be served hot, you must use this common sense information appropriately and take measure to ensure you do not scold yourself, failure to do so will result in injury.

Now the coffee incident is not a life threatening situation, but it does highlight the problem.
You MUST open your eyes, ears and mind, you must engage the brain and utilise common sense, if you do not then it is your fault that you become the victim.

In other words, should you find yourself face to face with a mugger, it’s your fault.

Is that a bit harsh? Maybe.Is it justified? Yes.

Unless you are attacked completely at random, there will be a sequence of events leading up to the attack. You will have been selected as a potential victim, targeted, maybe followed, possibly approached, all before anything gets physical. It’s very much like the nature programs on the discovery channel, the Lions don’t attack the Alpha male in a herd of wildebeest, instead they go for the weak one that’s not paying attention. Joe Scumbag will do just the same.

If you present yourself as a target, you will be treated like one. It’s your fault.
If your head is down and Joe Scumbag approaches you, then you haven’t seen him coming, that again is your fault.

If you find yourself in a situation where you must physically defend yourself, have you trained yourself to do this? Are you fit to run away? Are you strong enough to push him back? Are you skilled enough to escape his grasp? Are you aware of the vulnerable targets on a body? No? Guess what, it’s your fault that you were unable to defend yourself.

That’s a hell of a burden to carry.
The alternative is simple, do something about it.

Leave the iPod at home and listen to what’s going on around you, walk tall, keep the head up so that you can see around you, be aware of your surroundings. Train a little (or a lot) to be physically able to at least run away, at best throw a knock out (or knock down) strike and then run away.

When we take some responsibility for what happens to us, we can look for ways to change what happens. We can start to take control of our lives, our health and our safety. Once we have control of our own selves, we can then help others either by looking out for them or by inspiring them to better themselves.
Take action today, it will become a habit, you owe it to yourself.

Wild Geese
www.wildgeesema.com
www.wg-fit.com

The Ultimate Self Defence Move

Ladies and Gentlemen, I have recently learned the ultimate in self defence technique.

And I’m going to share it with you.

Recently I was training one of our regular private clients, when they stopped and told me of a course they had just been on.

This course was run at her job.

A course so well thought out, it came with a manual.

The manual was so well written anyone who reads it will fully understand the intricacies of self defence in such detail as to be able to teach to a room full of beginners.

The manual could be described as the real world equivalent of Kung Fu Panda’s Dragon Scroll.

But enough hype. Lets now look at the climax of the course, as taught from the manual.

This is quite possible the most groundbreaking self defence manoeuvre I have ever come across in 20+ years of Martial Arts training and 10+ years working in private security and Door work.

It is this:

“Should your assailant bite your arm, do not pull away, instead push forward
into the persons mouth.”

So far so good, but it’s basic common sense, if you pull out the teeth may rip your flesh. We all know that, so what’s the secret, groundbreaking move…….

Here it is:

“With your free hand, tickle the assailants top lip just under his nose.
This will stimulate their parasympathetic nervous system and cause their jaw
to drop releasing your arm from the bite. You now step away.”

Wow.

Who’d have thought of tickling a man hell bent on biting through your arm.
I told you it was ground breaking.

This is the type of bullshit being taught by unqualified, inexperienced “self defence” instructors. If you’ve ever been in a fight, even if it’s just a friendly sparring match down the dojo, would you think you would be stopped dead in your tracks by someone tickling you?

If you had a man sinking his teeth into you, do you believe that:
1 – You’d have the self control to tickle him and
2 – That it would actually dissolve the situation.

I don’t.

I’ve been bitten. Twice. In different scenarios as a doorman.

Now, I realise that I’m merely talking from experience here, I don’t have a manual to follow, but here’s what I have done when someone has attempted to bite me:
I have done something most “instructors” are too squeamish to teach.
I stuck my finger deep into the man’s eye socket.

The result, the assailants jaw drops as he squeals in pain, his head snaps back as he attempts to move his eyes away from the attack, he takes a step backwards.

What did I do next?
I put the man on the floor and restrained him while the authorities were called.

That’s because I was working security. If it was a street scenario, a self defence situation, I’d simply drop him and run.

Regardless of the outcome, get yourself to the Doctor for blood tests and tetanus booster. Bites, even from people, especially from people, can carry a whole heap of infections.

I’m not an advocate of violence, but sometimes you have no option. If some lowlife decides to bite you, hurt him, end of story.
What would happen if your dog bit someone? You would be obliged to have him put down.
Why would the rules be different for a person? If you get bitten, put the guy down and get the hell out of there.

If some muppet reads a self defence course from a manual, ask him to back up what he says with personal anecdotes. Ask him what his experience is. And if the answer is “It’s in the manual” hit him with it and leave.

Wild Geese run bespoke Self Defence and Control & Restraint courses. These courses are based on real world experience, both from experience we have gained personally and from experience gleaned from those better than ourselves.
We have taught at the Academia De Police in Aguas Calientes Mexico, for the Presidential Guard in the Gambia, to Greenbow Lgbt, Price Waterhouse Coopers, Tekken Security and Door Security Management in Dublin and regularly consult for ESTS <http://www.specialist-security.com/ an internationally recognised leader in security training and services.
The picture above was taken at a seminar in Mexico. Wild Geese Chief Instructor Paul Cox showing control & restraint as members of the various Law Enforcement agencies look on.

If you or your company feels the need for Self Defence training, maybe you work within the Security Field and require Control & Restraint and Baton (Asp) please drop us a line anytime to info@wildgeesema.com

Regards

Dave Hedges

www.WildGeeseMA.com

www.WG-Fit.com

087 672 6090

Knives – Again…..

In the news again this week, another fatal stabbing.

The quiet country town of Tullamore, Co. Offaly, a woman stabbed to death receiving in the region of 40 wounds.

The weapon of choice…… A bread knife.

Thankfully our government saw fit to ban Samurai swords, otherwise the situation could have been a whole lot worse!

Apologies, I’m being facetious. I mean no disrespect to the victim or her family. I do however wish to take a look at the larger picture, one in which she has unfortunately become a detail in.

The picture is this, weapons are easily accessible to anyone who wish to cause harm. Right now, as I write this i have a steak knife left over from dinner beside the laptop, a glass bottle (yes, it’s a beer bottle) beside it, a steel pen on the other side.
All of these, if I so chose, could become offensive and potentially lethal weapons, and I haven’t even got u from the table.
Imagine if I took out the tool bag from under the stairs and grabbed any one of the screwdrivers, a chisel or stanley. A few extra steps has me in the kitchen, well enough said.

What is there to possible stop somebody like me in a such a weapon rich environment as the humble family home?

There is only your own training, your common sense, your awareness. The prevention beats cure mindset is always the best, but you must have a cure ready just in case.
A powerful, repetitive right hand pummelling into my skull may just slow me down enough that you might make your escape or a well timed disarm or “return to sender” could end my attack there and then.
We’ll never know, but it’s worth thinking about.

In your house, right now, as your reading this post, can you see your escape route if someone attacked you, what weapons are close to hand?
Even if you have a weapon, do you have the knowledge, training and confidence to use them?

Maybe that woman could have survived if she’d been able to put the man down or disarm him. Maybe.

Perhaps if she’d seen the event before it occurred she may have escaped. Maybe.

It’s easy to sit here an hypothesise, but put yourself in her shoes, how would you have coped with a lunatic coming at you with a blade, murder in his heart. No amount of harsh penalties or sword ban is going to stop a man like this only you can.

If you have the training.

Drop us a line now, we may be able to help you help yourself.

Don’t become a statistic, take a personal responsibility for your safety and the safety of those around you. Get down and do some training, your not too old or too weak, but without it you are too vulnerable.

I’d like you to come to us (or book us to come to you) but there are plenty of others teaching good stuff, there will be someone in your area, you just have to find them.

Get some training.

Stay safe

Wild Geese
every cause but our own
Kenpo / Eskrima / BJJ / Strength & Conditioning
www.wildgeesema.com/ wildgeesema.blogspot.com
info@wildgeesema.com
+353 87 672 6090
Facebook / Twitter / RSS feed

Knives Don’t Kill People, People Do

A few days ago I was asked to speak on Radio Kerry regarding my views on the ban on the sale of samurai swords.
In short, while I’m in favour of getting blades off the streets, I don’t think the ban is the right way to go.

While driving to and from Wild Geese HQ, I have time on my own in the car to spend thinking about various aspects of life. Since the phone call with Radio Kerry, I’ve been thinking about knives a lot. Then I thought, well it’s not the knife’s fault, it’s the person wielding it. Then I started to think back over the most recent incidents.

The phone call from Kerry was due to a clash between two rival feuding families. During this clash various weapons were seized by the Garda (Irish Police), these weapons included a few Samurai swords, several Slash hooks, hammers and various other weapons.
The most recent event leading to the sword ban was a chopping in Dublin, where a samurai sword and hammer were used in an attack which left a man missing a hand.
There was an incident in one of Dublin’s more affluent areas where a lad walked off, only to return with a kitchen knife which he used on several people before ending his own life. If I remember right, he actually walked around to a nearby shop to buy the knife before returning.
While we can successfully ban the outlandish, speciality knives, but slash hooks are a farming & gardening tool, kitchen knives are well, we know what they’re for, fancy living without them?

Then in the news there is talk of harsher penalties for those that are caught carrying a blade. Again fair enough. But still, I think they’re missing the point.

When asked about the ban and the various penalties I often compare knife attacks with shootings. In Ireland guns are illegal, they have never been legal and most likely never will be, yet there are still people getting shot in Dublin with alarming regularity.
If guns are banned, and the penalties for owning one, never mind carrying or using one are serious, what difference will it make for those who favour the blade?
In my mind, none.

So, back to knives. We’ve got two warring families using whatever’s at hand. We’ve got gangland choppings, most likely as a punishment or warning. We’ve got a disturbed young man on a suicidal rampage. All used blades in their attacks. Which of the three do you think was considering the possible penalties from their actions?

Most likely none of them. So what if the blades they used were unavailable, ie banned?
In my mind they’d simply find an alternative weapon. Hammers, screwdrivers, chisels, glass & bottles, baseball bats, hurls the list goes on. These things are merely tools, inanimate objects, without an operator to use them they are absolutely harmless. This was illustrated in Thursdays Independent newspaper there were two reports following the deaths of people beaten to death. Punched and kicked in the head so brutally as to cause death. Now we’re hardly going to ban shoes, or are we?

So if a ban isn’t going to stop people destroying other people, what is?
This is a whole other issue, one that I am far from qualified to talk about. There is however a comments button below this post, please use it and offer your opinions if you have them. Maybe we’ll come up with a few answers.

The final point I’d like to make, is that the majority of these attacks and their victims are targeted. Criminal gangs and families that are fighting and feuding for whatever reason. The reasons are unimportant to you and I, we merely have to make sure we don’t get caught up in the crossfire.
Many people are unlucky enough to get caught in these things, with a little bit of training in awareness and self defence, perhaps they’d be able to get out before things turned nasty.

Obviously there are attacks with purely vicious motives, thefts and even random attacks where the attackers don’t know their victims. These our the main types of attack we need to prepare ourselves for.
Your safety is your responsibility, keep yourself aware of your surroundings and undertake some form of training so that you can get yourself out of trouble.

Remember the bodyguard mantra:
Avoid – Stay away from the threat
Escape – Get away from threat
Confront – If all else fails, go on the attack and dissolve the threat.

If you choose to learn how to defend yourself against a knife, Wild Geese chief instructor Paul Cox is one of the few European Doce Pares blackbelts to be registered in the Philippines. It is commonly accepted by those in the know that the Filipino Martial Arts are at the top of the food chain for when it comes to weapon defence. Paul regularly travels over to Grandmaster Danny Guba, a man with, as he says, a record.
I myself learn from Paul, when I have opportunity, Danny Guba and also have put together self defence training programs that are now being implemented by our associates over at ESTS (www.specialist-security.com)

Regards
Dave Hedges

Wild Geese
every cause but our own
Kenpo / Eskrima / BJJ / Strength & Conditioning
www.wildgeesema.com/ wildgeesema.blogspot.com
info@wildgeesema.com
+353 87 672 6090
Facebook / Twitter / RSS feed

Violence is a learned behaviour

Listening to the radio in the car the other day, an ad came on. It was an ad talking about domestic violence and a support group for it, I have to say I really wasn’t paying attention, until the tag line came out….

Now I admit I read a few articles on marketing and the like and I realise the importance of a snappy tag line to capture your audience’s attention, I was impressed at this one, but not for the reasons the company wanted (I can’t remember the name of the company or what they’re actual message was, only this line)

The line was this:

“Violence is a learned behaviour, it can be unlearned.”

How very true.

We can learn to be violent, we could it learn from our peers, our parents, the telly or even head down the martial arts club to learn it.
Some people grow up knowing it, others learn it later in life, often as a result of something external.
Unlearning it is not something we at Wild Geese are really into, after all we’ve made a name by being damn good at violence. Our particular brand of violence is being taught to security forces in Mexico, the Gambia and Paul is currently in Cuba checking on our instructors there.

But what really separates our approach to violence is that it is controlled, it is directed, it is taught to be used as a tool.
It’s not violence for violence sake. We’ve had students who have wanted to become more efficient at hurting people for the wrong reasons, people who just wanted to fight other people, these never last long in our school, they are encouraged to leave pretty quickly using whatever methods are most appropriate at the time.

However most of our regular students are just people who want to learn to defend themselves or wish to get fitter and stronger while also learning a useful skill set.
May abhor the thought of actually hurting another human being, but will happily spend hours developing a powerful punch on the bags and study the intricacies of a joint manipulations to be able to dislocate arms.

They are learning violence.

Yet in doing so they are doing something more.
They are facing the thing that most of us fear most, the fear of attack, being helpless against an aggressor. They are learning things that just may save their skins,
In doing so they develop as a human being, knowledge is power and this power shows through.

If you’ve spent multiple hours every week hitting and being hit, locking and being locked, grabbing and escaping in the martial arts classes, do you really have much to fear in the outside world?
You’ve willingly stood in front of another person and allowed them to attack you over and over so that you may practice your defences. And you’ve been the person doing the attacks and have received the defences, which often times hurts.

This power, this knowledge breeds confidence. You know you can defend yourself, you know you can take a hit and keep fighting. This confidence shines through, others especially the people most prone to violent outbursts, the bullies, can sense it.
This simple confidence can be enough to keep you safe from harm, if it doesn’t, then you at least have a punch to back it up.

Yet at the same time as learning violence, you learn respect. Having a man allow you to hit them so that you may practice technique breeds respect, especially as it’ll be your turn next.
You learn that while violence is a tool, it is a tool that should only be used when absolutely necessary, and only to the point where the job is done.
This video was passed onto me by a friend, it demonstrates my point exactly:

Violence is a learned behaviour, as is respect, come to Wild Geese and learn it.

Regards

Wild Geese
every cause but our own
http://www.wildgeesema.com/
+353 87 672 6090
info@wildgeesema.com
Subscribe to our monthly newsletter by emailing:
newsletter-subscribe@wildgeesema.com

Balanced Self Defence

Go to a self defence course and you’ll usually get taught a hundred ways to damage a body.

Go to a self protection and you learn probably fewer ways to hurt people but also get a load of ways to avoid getting into trouble in the first place. Oh, and learn how to not be too upset about the ordeal afterwards.

Go to a martial arts class and you’ll get taught whatever interpretation of whatever some dead, probably Asian, guy used to defeat countless enemies.

But then take a look at the older and more esoteric systems. Particularly the Okinawan, Chinese, the lesser known Thai arts and Indian martial arts. You’ll see a vastly different approach to what is often espoused today.

With the rise of the UFC, and “mixed martial arts” we have developed a blood sweat and tears mindset, an “if it don’t work in the ring/octagon, why bother with it” attitude.

Many non MMA’ers have turned to the so called “Reality Based” Self Defence, where the same blood sweat and tears mindset prevails. They think sports are silly and instead train for the fateful day society breaks down and we all have to wear combat pants, shave our heads and be “dead ‘ard”.

But there is something missing still.

The “real as it gets” MMA or the “Reality” self defence are still incomplete as self defence systems. They lack the elements made that the “old fashioned” systems complete.
Systems that these modern “warriors” seem to think are usless.But self defence, and indeed the martial arts, are about much more than hurting people and fighting.

The term Self Defence can be defined as:

Defending oneself from harm using whatever means necessary.

The word harm could be anything that would adversely affect your well being.

Not just a violent attack, but health issues, environmental issues, stress. Self Defence is about being ready and prepared to deal with anything.

Many of the more esoteric arts include support systems or training protocols that are designed keep the body and mind agile and strong, even into old age.
Meditation, Chi Gung and Yoga type programs would go hand in hand with the physical kick/punch training.

Hard would be balanced with soft. Resulting in an even and well rounded individual.
It is these support systems that seem to have been forgotten in the quest for greater speed and knockout power. Yet if you wish to still be training well into your twilight years, it is these systems that will get you there.

The meditations and chi gungs will assist the body in recovering from the abuse of hard training, they will calm and focus the mind, they loosen and relax tense muscles and maintain a strong will and a disciplined, agile mind.

The esoteric or holistic systems start with the individual. There is no focus on anything external, be it opponents or muggers until the student has first gained mastery of themselves.

After all, are we not our own worst enemies?

Don’t forget, we are expecting the first delivery of the Wild Geese Martial Arts Hoodies any time soon, make sure to get your order in so you don’t miss out!

Regards
Wild Geese
info@wildgeesema.com
www.wildgeesema.com
www.noequipment.blogspot.com
+353 87 672 6090

Switching On

Martial Arts, ultimately, is about fighting.
Put whatever philosophical spin on it you like and you will still never get away from the fact that spending hours learning to punch, kick, choke and dislocate is the pursuit of violence.

I’ve no problem with that, the skills I’ve learnt over the years have on several occasions pulled me out of a tight spot. I know all the official Wild Geese Martial Arts instructors around the world can say exactly the same.

Unfortunately there are many who can’t. (upon rereading that last sentence, it actually may be better saying “fortunately”, as getting into a fight isn’t really something to be proud of. Avoiding a fight, is.)

Most of us have heard of at least one story where Johnny Black Belt had his arse handed to him on the street. Yet this same martial arts “expert” is practically untouchable in the Dojo or the ring.
So what happened? Why could he not be as efficient outside as he is in his home ground.

Ah, I let it slip there. Home Ground. Comfort Zone.
The knowledge that you are not going to get hurt, or at least only get slightly hurt, the knowledge that some one is watching for foul moves and bad attitude, this knowledge can become detrimental on the street.

It can hold us back in a couple of ways:

  1. We become fearful when forced outside our comfort zone
  2. We become complacent to violence.

Lets look at number 1.
Fear is normal. In fact dealt with correctly it can serve to our advantage. Fear is largely down to a chemical change in our body. The rapid release of adrenaline, the fight or flight hormone. There is also a third option, freeze.
And if you freeze, you’re toast.
This is why we need to learn to switch on. Snap out of the frozen state and launch into either full on fight or rapid flight.
Your training can, and should help with this. By training with the knowledge that your skills are of value, and occasionally putting them to the test, you will gain the confidence to use them while frightened and under pressure.
But thats still not the most important point.
You must also learn how to go from zero to 100 ,miles an hour in less than a heartbeat. You must have a trigger that will set you in motion, not stopping until the threat has been eliminated.

What is your trigger?
Hell, I don’t know. Maybe it’s Bruce Buffer’s “Lets Get Ready To Rumble” that gets your hackles up. Perhaps it’s the sound of a the bell or whistle. Find it, memorize it, internalise it and keep it in your head.
When the time come to get down and dirty, replay it in your head and BANG! Your away like a man possessed.

The downside, if you haven’t recognised the threat before it’s too late, no amount of triggers can help you.

Option 2, was becoming complacent to violence.
Has your ego become so overgrown that you fear nothing and nobody? Maybe you have gone unbeaten in the ring and your are the top dog down the Dojo. That doesn’t mean some bloke half you size, with no training, can’t put a glass through your face.
Begin to realise the dangers of what your up against and loose the ego. If you’re as good as you think you are, a little fear will sharpen you up to a razors edge.

While it is important to switch on, don’t forget to switch off again afterwards. Just always try to maintain your awareness so that you can avoid any further trouble, or switch onto a new threat.

All the best

Wild Geese
every cause but our own
www.wildgeesema.com
info@wildgeesema.com
For our newsletter email:
newsletter-subscribe@wildgeesema.com

Total Self Defence

Go to a self defence course and you’ll usually get taught a hundred ways to damage a body.

Go to a self protection and you learn probably fewer ways to hurt people but also get a load of ways to avoid getting into trouble in the first place. Oh, and learn how to not be too upset about the ordeal afterwards.

Go to a martial arts class and you’ll get taught whatever interpretation of whatever some dead, probably Asian, guy used to defeat countless enemies.

But then take a look at the older and more esoteric systems. Particularly the Okinawan, Chinese, the lesser known Thai arts and Indian martial arts.
You’ll see a vastly different approach to what is often espoused today.

With the rise of the UFC, and “mixed martial arts” we have developed a blood sweat and tears mindset, an “if it don’t work in the ring/octagon, why bother with it” attitude.
Many non MMA’ers have turned to the so called “Reality Based” Self Defence, where the same blood sweat and tears mindset prevails. They think sports are silly and instead train for the fateful day society breaks down and we all have to wear combat pants, shave our heads and be dead ‘ard.

But there is something missing still.

The “real as it gets” MMA or the “Reality” self defence are still incomplete as self defence systems. They lack the elements made that the “old fashioned” systems complete.
Systems that these modern “warriors” seem to think are usless.

But self defence, and indeed the martial arts, are about much more than hurting people and fighting.
The term Self Defence can be defined as:

Defending oneself from harm using whatever means necessary

The word harm could be anything that would adversely affect your well being.
Not just a violent attack, but health issues, environmental issues, stress. Self Defence is about being ready and prepared to deal with anything.

Many of the more esoteric arts include support systems or training protocols that are designed keep the body and mind agile and strong, even into old age.
Meditation, Chi Gung and Yoga type programs would go hand in hand with the physical kick/punch training.
Hard would be balanced with soft.

It is these support systems that seem to have been forgotten in the quest for greater speed and knockout power. Yet if you wish to still be training well into your twilight years, it is these systems that will get you there.
The meditations and chi gungs will assist the body in recovering from the abuse of hard training, they will calm and focus the mind, they loosen and relax tense muscles and maintain a strong will and a disciplined, agile mind.

The esoteric or holistic systems start with the individual. There is no focus on anything external, be it opponents or muggers until the student has first gained mastery of themselves.

After all, are we not our own worst enemies?

Regards

Wild Geese
www.wildgeesema.com
www.noequipment.blogspot.com
+353 87 672 6090

No Sh1t Sherlock!

I just saw a news headline on the TV ticker tape thing, now before I go off on a rant, I only read the headline, I haven’t heard the entire story.

I don’t think I need to.

The headline went:
“Probation officers are at risk of violence”

Surely thats like saying “Ducks are at risk of getting wet”

Let me think, who else is at risk of violence……

Doormen
Police/Gardai
A&E Nurses and other hospital staff
Bus drivers
Firemen
Prison officers
Taxi Drivers
Publicans and their staff
Bank employees
Social workers
Retail and other security guards
The Homeless
Anybody using an ATM
Kids with glasses
Kids with ginger hair
Kids with braces, in fact any kid that is a little different
The elderly or infirm (yes there are cruel bstrds out there)
Any Joe Soap in the wrong place at the wrong time

The list really does go on.

What gets my goat is that nobody wants to do anything about it.
When I asked a student of mine who is a respected member of the Irish Police Force (Gardai) about the training he received in Garda college, he laughed at me. it turns out their self defence and control & restraint training is considered a standing joke.

When I enquired further he alluded to the truth. Now to be clear, this is how I interpreted what he said, these are not his words, they are mine:
The powers that be would rather pay one of their own sick leave than pay a scumbags legal claim, therfore self defence/martial arts training is discouraged.

Is that incredible or what?!?!

Now what about the poor probation officers?
They like the rest of us need to take our sefety into our own hands. Nobody is going to look after us, it is up to ourselves to decide wether to be victims or not.
By going out and getting trained, you are choosing not.

Whatever flavour of training catches you imagination, be it lifting heavy kettlebells, swinging Eskrima sticks, rolling with BJJ, Kickboxing or the brutality of Kenpo, it is of little difference.
The end result is that you will have strength, speed, skill and knowledge with which to tackle a violent aggressor.

We are all at risk of violence, it is just that some professions bring us closer to it than others, but every friday and saturday night the streets get a little rougher.

Don’t bury your head in the sand, learn to take care of yourself and ensure you are able to get home safely to your family, whatever you do for a living.

Regards

Wild Geese
www.wildgeesema.com