Tag Archives: Steve Tappin

Basics, basics, basics!

I lost count of the amount of times Jack Parker would shout this at me and the other kids at St Martins Jnr Karate Club. “Without the basics” he would say “you’re advanced techniques would be worthless”

Last weekend Steve Tappin was over in Dublin showcasing his Escrima Concepts system. He advocated the same thing. “Too many styles concentrate on the flash and fancy stuff,” he said “but if you can’t do the simple stuff, you’ll never get to apply it”

Good advice as Steve teaches serious police, military and security operators around the world. People that unlike recreational martial artists and sport fighters, may have to employ this knowledge in the execution of their duties.

Steve’s Escrima Concepts and Wado Ryu Karate as taught by Jack are very different, but yet the two teachers are so similar in their outlook. This is because they’ve both been at the sharp end and know whats important and what will get you hurt.

Too man arts are so heavily influenced by the flash seen on the competition floor or the goggle box in the corner that they’re loosing their practicality, hence the suddn rise of “Reality” based martial arts. Not that I’ve anything against the good Reality systems (eg Mick Coup’s and Geoff Thompsons methods), but there are as many bad instructors in that world as there are in the “Traditional” world.

As a side note for the fitness folks, Craig Ballantyne, another guy I respect, has a new ebook on sale (I got mine free) focusing on the basic lifts any weight trainer should be doing, regardless of their goals. He calls it the Big 5 Workout (look here for more on it it’s about basics.

Whatever you do, be it Martial arts (from whatever stable), fitness training or any other pursuit, take some advice from three great instructors, Jack Parker, Steve Tappin and Craig Ballantyne.

Never forget the basics.

Wild Geese
any cause but our own
www.wildgeesema.com
www.wg-fit.com

The Wrong End Of the Stick

I often find that peoples view of the Filipino Martial Arts is somewhat inaccurate. I hope here to put it right.

FMA otherwise known as Eskrima, Kali or Arnis are the fighting arts native to the Philippines, and are a complete combat method. Unfortunately the popular view of these arts is that it’s just “Stick Fighting”.

This was illustrated most clearly by the owner of the Martial Arts Academy when he offered to make up posters to advertise our class. Guess what we got.

Yep, you guessed it. “Learn Stick Fighting”

Now while we do train with sticks, no argument there, we also fight with sticks. This is the start point for any new FMAer, learn to swing a stick. But that’s just the beginning.

As I said it’s a complete fighting system used throughout the ages to fight off rival tribes and invasions (including Magellan and the Spanish and later the Japanese in world war 2), would stick fighting cover this.

No. Most people fail to see the unarmed combat, the knife/machete use and defence. The Filipino method is to teach you to instinctively use any weapon that comes to hand to fight against any weapon that comes at you. Be it a punch, kick, blade or blunt instrument. It is this versatility that attracted notable martial artists like Ed Parker, Bruce Lee and Dan Innosanto to add elements taken from Kali/Arnis and add it into their respective styles.

Within FMA there are many areas to cover and masters do specialise, Momoy Canete specialised in longer range Espada y Daga, Cacoy Canete specialised in close range stick fighting. Antonio Illustrisimo specialised in the blade, Joe Borces uses “eskrido” a combination of traditional FMA and Aikido/Judo methods.
But these are the masters. Any student must be able to defend themselves against unarmed and armed attacks while they themselves may or may not be armed.

I have my students fighting 1 on 1, 2 on 1, 2 on 2, every man for themselves and many other combo’s.
I have an unarmed guy fighting against a knife man, or a single stick fighting against double stick. We allow disarms but expect the fight to continue so a fight er becomes used to loosing a weapon but carrying on unarmed, or to suddenly find a weapon and instantly use it.

The competitions may be about “stick fighting” but FMA is about surviving by using whatever comes to hand. It’s about assuming the other guy is armed. It’s about adapting to any scenario.

We are lucky to have had coverage on the recent TV shows. Our own Doce Pares HQ in Cebu was visited in the BBC’s Mind, Body & Kick ass Moves and the History Channels Human Weapon. While Fight Quest remained in Manila showing Pekiti Tirsia and Modern Arnis. Where different aspects of our arts are being shown. But for more info come and visit us, look on you tube (Rapid Arnis have some good clips).

We are also hosting FMA master and Security Expert Steve Tappin in May. Expect to see how FMA is truly effective on the streets of Europe as Steve regularly travel to the worst spots in Europe to train their respective police and security forces.
I almost feel sorry for the criminals, almost.

Come to Steve’s seminar and see how your own training can be enhanced by the Filipino martial arts.

Wild Geese
any cause but our own